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for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
in america were. the designer of washington's city, there was a competition and he submitted a design for a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat told congress it was neither a large nor awe-inspiring. he said the building served its purpose. if it was more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to be its permanent resident. >> a photo credit has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. you can watch sunday evening on 7:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> my inspiration was the idea that wanted to explain how it happened. istook taylor we know the main events from our point of view. what wanted to do was show from a different angle, from the ground up what it felt like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices int hat system. one of the things that has happened is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2